Contributing To MDN Web Docs

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Contributing To MDN Web Docs

Contributing To MDN Web Docs

Rachel Andrew



MDN Web Docs has been documenting the web platform for over twelve years and is now a cross-platform effort with contributions and an Advisory Board with members from Google, Microsoft and Samsung as well as those representing Firefox. Something that is fundamental to MDN is that it is a huge community effort, with the web community helping to create and maintain the documentation. In this article, I’m going to give you some pointers as to the places where you can help contribute to MDN and exactly how to do so.

If you haven’t contributed to an open source project before, MDN is a brilliant place to start. Skills needed range from copyediting, translating from English to other languages, HTML and CSS skills for creating Interactive Examples, or an interest in browser compatibility for updating Browser Compatibility data. What you don’t need to do is to write a whole lot of code to contribute. It’s very straightforward, and an excellent way to give back to the community if you have ever found these docs useful.

Contributing To The Documentation Pages

The first place you might want to contribute is to the MDN docs themselves. MDN is a wiki, so you can log in and start to help by correcting or adding to any of the documentation for CSS, HTML, JavaScript or any of the other parts of the web platform covered by MDN.

To start editing, you need to log in using GitHub. As is usual with a wiki, any editors of a page are listed, and this section will use your GitHub username. If you look at any of the pages on MDN contributors are listed at the bottom of the page, the below image shows the current contributors to the page on CSS Grid Layout.


A list showing names of people who contributed to this page
The contributors to the CSS Grid Layout page. (Large preview)

What Might You Edit?

Things that you might consider as an editor are fixing obvious typos and grammatical errors. If you are a good proofreader and copyeditor, then you may well be able to improve the readability of the docs by fixing any spelling or other errors that you spot.

You might also spot a technical error, or somewhere the specs have changed and where an update or clarification would be useful. With the huge range of web platform features covered by MDN and the rate of change, it is very easy for things to get out of date, if you spot something – fix it!

You may be able to use some specific knowledge you have to add additional information. For example, Eric Bailey has been adding Accessibility Concerns sections to many pages. This is a brilliant effort to highlight the things we should be thinking about when using a certain thing.


A screenshot of the Accessibility Concerns section
This section highlights the things we should be aware of when using background-color. (Large preview)

Another place you could add to a page is in adding “See also” links. These could be links to other parts of MDN, or to external resources. When adding external resources, these should be highly relevant to the property, element or technique being described by that document. A good candidate would be a tutorial which demonstrates how to use that feature, something which would give a reader searching for information a valuable next step.

How To Edit A Document?

Once you are logged in you will see a link to Edit on pages in MDN, clicking this will take you into a WYSIWYG editor for editing content. Your first few edits are likely to be small changes, in which case you should be able to follow your nose and edit the text. If you are making extensive edits, then it would be worth taking a look at the style guide first. There is also a guide to using the WYSIWYG Editor.

After making your edit, you can Preview and then Publish. Before publishing it is a good idea to explain what you added and why using the Revision Comment field.


Screenshot of this field in the edit form
Add a comment using the Revision Comment field. (Large preview)

Language Translations

Those of us with English as a first language are incredibly fortunate when it comes to information on the web, being able to get pretty much all of the information that we could ever want in our own language. If you are able to translate English language pages into other languages, then you can help to translate MDN Web Docs, making all of this information available to more people.


A screenshot showing the drop-down translations list
Translations available for the background-color page. (Large preview)

If you click on the language icon on any page, you can see which languages that information has been translated into, and you can add your own translations following the information on the page Translating MDN Pages.

Interactive Examples

The Interactive Examples on MDN, are the examples that you will see at the top of many pages of MDN, such as this one for the grid-area property.


Screenshot of an Interactive Example
The Interactive Example for the grid-area property. (Large preview)

These examples allow visitors to MDN to try out various values for CSS properties or try out a JavaScript function, right there on MDN without needing to head into a development environment to do so. The project to add these examples has been in progress for around a year, you can read about the project and progress to date in the post Bringing Interactive Examples to MDN.

The content for these Interactive Examples is held in the Interactive Examples GitHub repository. For example, if you wanted to locate the example for grid-area, you would find it in that repo under live-examples/css-examples/grid. Under that folder, you will find two files for grid-area, an HTML and a CSS file.

grid-area.html


<section id="example-choice-list" class="example-choice-list large" data-property="grid-area">
    
grid-area: a;

grid-area: b;

grid-area: c;

grid-area: 2 / 1 / 2 / 4;

</section>



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